Chris Coloian: New interests, projects and initiatives in healthcare

Chris Coloian: New interests, projects and initiatives in healthcare

By Brad Dodge on March 16th, 2011

Also at the 2011 Healthcare Summit at Jackson Hole, I talked with Chris Coloian, principal at Assabet Ventures and the Chairperson at the Care Continuum Alliance.

Dodge: Chris, tell our readers about your business.
Coloian: We are a management advisory, consulting, and  business development firm helping early-stage and transitionary companies with their strategy and business development. We’re primarily focused in the healthcare service and provider space.
Dodge: What types of challenges are you facing in your business?
Coloian: At the highest level, there’s a lot of change going on in the healthcare marketplace.  As an advisor I’m spending a lot of time assuring leaders about directions, helping them determine what the safe bets are right now. Where can they spend their time and energy and yield results. One of the challenges we have is that there’s a lot of interest, projects and initiatives keying up, but sometimes it takes longer for clients to get going because they are trying to determine what initiatives they should take on at this time.

Dodge: What impact does the federal spotlight on healthcare--such as meaningful use and ACOs have--on your business?
Coloian: In one regard, it’s a tremendous time because there’s a new sense of optimism in healthcare about new models and some of the things in the healthcare delivery system that we all know need to be fixed around the delivery of care. There’s a new optimism on trying to fix some of the payment structures, some of the delivery structures out there so I think that will drive some of the changes the federal government is mandating. But I think even more importantly it’s the baby boomers that are coming into the marketplace with their expectations. Consumer expectation is going to be one of the big drivers of the changes that go on and I think that some of the reform and payment and accountability that the government is highlighting is really in response to what consumers desire to have a more efficient system. They’ve watched their parents go through this current system, they’ve been a generation trying to take care of their kids and their parents and they’re not happy with health system they’re getting today. So I think that reform is only the beginning point—it’s created a disruption moment that allow some of the consumer initiatives can really take hold. And it should create opportunities for those companies that are listening to what the consumer wants.